history

Narrower Terms

Missing Women

"This poem is dedicated to the women who have gone missing from history and from their own lives."
"I began writing this poem is 2011 and I suspect I have not yet finished. It has been revised several times, most importantly to include the addition of the back half of the poem, where a handful of women and girls in Canada who died by suicide or murder are named. There are so many more whose names and stories we do not know."

The Witch's Child

Cover of The Witch's Child
A story about the fall of the Roman Empire. "The Witch’s Child urges us to celebrate the return of Spring. It is about the importance of May Day and what we have to gain by rooting ourselves in the rhythm of the seasons. After a long Winter of darkness and stillness, we’ve been feeling the resurgence of growth and we rise up too, to remember the importance of re-emerging after the cold, inward months." (from https://knowingtheland.com/2012/04/09/in-celebration-of-may-day-the-witchs-child/)

The Utopian Territory of Sub-Scotia

"In the stream of Halifax Harbour lies George's Island. With its lone lighthouse, lonelier looking house and thin grass, this tuft of earth— a glacial drumlin, in fact—we call George's Island has captured the imagination of many. Maybe you've stood on the waterfront thinking, "I'd love to just paddle over there." Artists John Matthews and Dennis Hale did just that last summer. Actually, August 7 marks the one-year anniversary of the founding of the Utopian Territory of Sub-Scotia. The explorers Matthews and Hale rowed over to the island on a raft made partly from reclaimed wood from a public art project by sculptor Warren Humeniuk." (from The Coast) "This pamphlet is provided as an aid for making a self-guided walking tour of the utopia and offers an insight into the original Sub-Scotia psychogeographic victory tour." Made during a Roberts Street residency.

Beasts of Burden

"This is a text which, we hope, faces in two directions. On the one hand we hope that it will be read by people interested in animal liberation who want to consider why animal exploitation exists, as well as how. On the other hand, by those who define themselves as anarchists or communists who either dismiss animal liberation altogether or personally sympathise with it but don't see how it relates to their broader political stance.

While there have always been groups and individuals with feet in both camps, for the most part discussion between those involved in animal liberation and communists has been at a derisory level. 'Debate,' in so far as it exists, consists mainly of abuse and rarely moves beyond the level of comments like 'wasn't Hitler a vegetarian (actually not - he injected 'bulls blood' into his testicles, and does this mean you can't be a communist and a house painter or an Austrian?).

We hope to prompt the beginnings of a real debate about the relationship between the 'animal question' and the 'social question'. This text does not claim to have all the answers or to be the 'communist manifesto' for animals, but we think it does pose some of the key questions. Over to you..."